Difference between revisions of "Colonial commoner"

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(Created page with "A listener of the show/podcast from countries that used to be part of the British Empire, such as the United States of America. The term was in use particularly around the tim...")
 
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A listener of the show/podcast from countries that used to be part of the British Empire, such as the United States of America. The term was in use particularly around the time of the release of the King's Speech. It was pointed out that there is great entertainment in seeing a member of the Royal Family interacting with a commoner (as also seen in Mrs Brown starring Judi Dench and Billy Connolly).
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A listener of the show/podcast from countries that used to be part of the British Empire, such as the United States of America. The term was in use particularly around the time of the release of the film "The King's Speech". It was pointed out that there is great entertainment in seeing a member of the Royal Family interacting with a commoner (as also seen in "Mrs Brown" starring Judi Dench and Billy Connolly).
  
 
And as they always say, "there's no commoner commoner than a colonial commoner."
 
And as they always say, "there's no commoner commoner than a colonial commoner."

Revision as of 14:12, 20 November 2014

A listener of the show/podcast from countries that used to be part of the British Empire, such as the United States of America. The term was in use particularly around the time of the release of the film "The King's Speech". It was pointed out that there is great entertainment in seeing a member of the Royal Family interacting with a commoner (as also seen in "Mrs Brown" starring Judi Dench and Billy Connolly).

And as they always say, "there's no commoner commoner than a colonial commoner."